Foreshots Photography

18121339_10211400893010402_1727158341117512564_o.jpg


Photography by Michael Yaneff
www.michaelyaneff.ca

MY SIGLOGO-BLACK.png
winning-logo.jpg
 

Hi, I'm Michael, owner of the headshot/performance/event photography company, Foreshots Photography, from Toronto, Canada. I have a lot of fun capturing images of some really amazing people, performers, and events.  However, outside of the business, I am very passionate about travel, adventure, and nature photography.  This page is for my personal photographic interests, where I share my love of exploring the world with my camera and finding ways to capture the emotion of each place I visit.  I'm often observing animals at various zoos, or trekking across the Scottish Highlands, while trying to fit all of the wonders of this earth into my viewfinder.  This page focuses on a completely different style and aspect of photography from the company, but it's still a very important part of who I am and how i like to see the world.  I hope you enjoy some of my images!  


PERSONAL PORTFOLIO

  ANIMALS

ANIMALS

  BUILDINGS AND INTERIORS

BUILDINGS AND INTERIORS

  CITYSCAPES

CITYSCAPES

  TRAVEL: ACROSS CANADA

TRAVEL: ACROSS CANADA

  TRAVEL: IRELAND & NORTHERN IRELAND

TRAVEL: IRELAND & NORTHERN IRELAND

  TRAVEL: SCOTLAND

TRAVEL: SCOTLAND

  TRAVEL: UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

TRAVEL: UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

  PEOPLE

PEOPLE


CONNECT

      EMAIL

     EMAIL

   INSTAGRAM

  INSTAGRAM

  FORESHOTS

 FORESHOTS

 

Wall art and prints are available for purchase.  E-mail for more information.


 Michael at Hopewell Rocks, New Brunswick

Michael at Hopewell Rocks, New Brunswick

PHILOSOPHY

Time.  It's a funny thing, isn't it. For years we've tried to understand its power over us. Is it real, or is it a human construction? Philosophers, scientists, and poets have all wrestled with this idea. Whatever time may be, one thing we know for sure is that time's arrow affects us all. No one is immune to the passage of time, and we all feel the changes. One morning, it seems, we're a fresh-faced teenager about to embark on the world ahead of us, with no idea what's in store, and the next we are parents, grandparents, professionals, with an entire trunk-load of memories. It's constant, and it's strange, and it doesn't stop.

I remember being in my final year of teacher's college, and I was doing a lesson about poetry using old photographs. I encouraged the students to dig through their albums at home for some photographic memory from their past. I shared a poem that I wrote about my grandfather after looking through some old albums. He had died a few years prior, and I was still trying to make sense of it all.

I then shared some photographs from when I was a child. I showed one from a family trip to Scotland, where my father was holding me near a rock face when I was not quite two years old. I recall remarking that it was so cool to see my father as a young man, with a new child, and another on the way, full of hope for the future, promises, expectations. I commented that at home, he's now much older, retired, with slightly greyer hair, and so much to look back upon. Did life go the way he planned? Was it what he expected? What new and wonderful things occurred that he could never have dreamed of, or what not so nice diversions have come his way? He always had his Nikon SLR with him, and I considered myself lucky that I had so many pictures from my childhood. We all had the chance to reflect, and I couldn't wait to share this teaching moment I had with my father when I got home.

That very same night, while I was working my part time job at a bookstore, my brother phoned me, worried, because dad wasn't picking up his phone, which was unusual. It was because he had passed away suddenly in his sleep.

In an instant, my life had completely changed. I obsessively collected every image I could find, to scan to the computer, to try and tell his story in the coming days to anyone who would listen. That is why I must photograph and document the world around me.

Shortly after losing my mother some years later, and also losing a great deal of my own direction, I picked up my first DSLR, a Nikon, like my father's, only digital. This started my own journey into this world, where I now work very hard to try and cram as much emotion and story into every shutter actuation.  From the heart-pounding vistas of Scotland that echo ancient myths and cultures, to a tender moment captured between a mother gorilla and her baby, there is magic everywhere. A photograph is more than just a click of a button; it truly is a way for us to stop time. Unlike video, it allows us to really sit with a single moment, explore all the details with our eyes, ask questions, wonder, ponder. You can lock eyes with the subject and imagine what they're thinking or dreaming about. The old cliché that a picture speaks a thousand words is not only true, it's an understatement. Each picture is a lifetime of thoughts, and an entire crazy journey that put each subject in that precise place for that precise 1/250 of a second that the shutter opens, and that instant is recorded on a sensor.

I hope you enjoy my work.

 

Michael